Sea to Sky Corridor communities disappointed with cuts to Greyhound service

Feb 27, 2018
District of Squamish, Electoral Area C, Electoral Area D, Resort Municipality of Whistler, Village of Pemberton

February 27, 2018: Sea to Sky Corridor, B.C. – On February 21, the Passenger Transportation Board (PTB) announced it has approved changes to Greyhound Canada’s service around British Columbia, including substantial reductions in the Sea to Sky Corridor.

The PTB has approved a reduction in service between Vancouver and Pemberton / Mount Currie and has also eliminated some bus stops on the route. The new minimum route frequency has been set at two trips weekly in each direction between Vancouver and Pemberton, the previous minimum had been seven trips weekly in each direction.  Service has been discontinued to these points on the Vancouver to Pemberton / Mount Currie route: West Vancouver, Britannia Beach, Pinecrest / Black Tusk and the Lil’wat Nation in Mount Currie.

Greyhound is only required to provide two weeks’ notice before making changes to schedules.

Transportation has been a substantial focus in the Sea to Sky Corridor in recent years. Reduced congestion, providing transit commuter service to support the growing economy and increased access to housing options has been a major focus.

Leadership from the District of Squamish, Lil’wat Nation, Resort Municipality of Whistler, Squamish Nation, Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, and Village of Pemberton plan on meeting with the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure to accelerate discussions toward regional transit solutions.

The PTB report on the changes cites Greyhound Canada’s rationale of lack of economic viability and increased competition on some routes and stops.  There are a number of carriers that operate in the Sea to Sky Corridor, but none are commuter-type services but rather services focused on visitors traveling through the corridor, with schedules that change by season.


District of Squamish

“This is just the latest reduction of service over the past 10 to 12 years that took what was once a fairly robust bus service to essentially a meaningless run designed to make maximum profit on parcel service, while leaving people out in the cold,” said Squamish Mayor Patricia Heintzman. “The Province needs to recognize the cumulative repercussions of these service changes, and to proactively work with us and BC Transit to fast track funding and implementation of a proper public transit service between Pemberton, Whistler, Squamish and Vancouver.”

Resort Municipality of Whistler

“The changes essentially rule Greyhound out as a commuter option for people in the region,” stated Whistler Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden. “Sea to Sky Corridor partners are extremely disappointed and see this as a step backward from the direction we have been moving to improve transportation in our region.”

Squamish-Lillooet Regional District

“Convenient, reliable, safe and affordable regional transportation options are vital to support liveable communities, a healthy environment, and the economic success of the region,” said Jack Crompton, SLRD Board Chair. “There’s no doubt that this reduction in Greyhound bus service will negatively impact many SLRD residents; the decision makes our efforts to develop a viable regional transit model even more urgent.”

Village of Pemberton

“The PTB approved cutbacks counter our regional efforts to enhance transit throughout the Corridor and to Vancouver.  In a time when our efforts are focused on reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, battling congestion and improving access to transit, this approval seems irresponsible and short sighted.  We will be expressing our concerns to the PTB and the Province on this matter,” said Pemberton Mayor Mike Richman.


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